Posted on December 21st, 2017

Goodreads from my reading, but here are my direct recommendations:

Non-fiction:


Here are some of the reads & comics I’ve found thought-provoking, recently. Ranked in priority-reading order:


Posted on June 6th, 2017

Here are some of the reads & comics I’ve found thought-provoking over the last week. Ranked in priority-reading order:

  1. Experimental Theology suggests the rainbow is theodicy:
  2. SMBC asks “Do you think we should acknowledge the difference between ‘should’ and ‘can’?”:
  3. Pictures of awesome Australian spiders:
  4. Lunarbaboon asks some questions: and offers some advice on “sweet moves”
  5. Maximumble picks up the “wholesome comic” torch this week:

Read anything over the last week that I should add for next time? Let me know in the comments!

Originally published at on June 6, 2017.


Posted on May 31st, 2017

Here are some of the reads & comics I’ve found thought-provoking over the last week. Ranked in priority-reading order:

  1. The Intercept reminds us that war is hideous, and Memorial Day tries to make us feel better about it:
  2. Cory Doctorow advertises for his latest book, but also talks about how technology can both aid and combat inequality:
  3. SMBC Comic asks: “what happened?”
  4. Taser is rebranding to Axon so we will forget the deaths, damage, and misuse associated with the company:
  5. Cool fantasy city generator, complete with “districts”:

Read anything over the last week that I should add for next time? Let me know in the comments!

Originally published at on May 31, 2017.


Here are some of the reads & comics I’ve found thought-provoking over the last week. Ranked in priority-reading order:

  1. The Restorative Justice movement is key (see my recommendation of ) to a more just society. This detailed essay gets into some of the political considerations and implications:
  2. Related: Slate Star Codex talks about the tactic of focusing on Bail Reform:
  3. Related: Freddie doBoer says “we can’t simultaneously be a movement based on rehabilitation and restorative justice AND a viciously judgmental moral aristocracy”
  4. Related: Mariame Kaba discusses prison-abolitionist tactics:
  5. Richard Beck of Experimental Theology once again…


Posted on April 1st, 2016

No Funnies Edition

  • . It hits so many sweet spots for me, such as quoting Jacques Ellul and criticizing advertising, propaganda, and this terrible upcoming US presidential election.
  • The ethical thing to do when you have a security vulnerability is to help the people responsible for the vulnerability to fix it. Often, it is instead hidden and weaponized, commoditized, and used against specific targets. However, during that period, non-targets with the same software can suffer the same attack until the owner of the software gets to fix it.

Posted on March 31st, 2016

The IBJ has that discusses the Anthem breach. Like many articles from many sources before, it does a poor job of being clear about the uses and types of two-factor authentication.

If you are not aware, two-factor authentication requires that you use two ways to prove who you are. This is often implemented by using something you know (account name and password) and something you have (a special token or certificate).

It is becoming common to use two-factor authentication for things such as remote access to a network (e.g. VPN). But it is…


Posted on March 30th, 2016

I mentioned in my “” post that one of the consequences of a ad-fueled Internet is that it affects our attention and the quality and nuance of our discourse. This is most evident in things in various types of clickbait, like listicles and hot takes.

There is an essay on the problems of hot takes . While I think they hit on the advertising-fueled modeled of publishing, I (naturally) don’t think they spent enough time there, and instead went on to diagnose the trend as a growth of some small subgroups of Internet…


Posted on March 18th, 2016

Only the Predestined Have Permits

I can see your responses, already:

“But maybe lots of neighborhood or out of town people park there, and then people can’t get to church.”

“Maybe they were having liability issues.”

“Maybe they are financially struggling to keep their ministry.”

There are a lots of things you could potentially call this, depending on the situation: “practical”, “economical”, “responsible”, or maybe even “necessary”.

What you cannot call it is “Christlike.

I want to be clear: this is not about one church. This (highly ironic) sign is representative of an epidemic affecting…


Posted on March 11th, 2016

Caution: a heavy set of articles, today.

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